Monday , October 3 2022

BC health authorities are encouraging families aged 5-11 to register for the vaccine



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BC health authorities are encouraging families to register to be vaccinated through the provincial Vaccination Forest portal as they await a federal investigation into the COVID-19 vaccine for children aged 5-11.

A BC health ministry spokesman told CBC News on Saturday that “registering your child is a big step as we are currently awaiting confirmation of Canadian Health.”

The Get Vaccinated portal went live in April and allowed different age groups to be vaccinated. When it was time to book an appointment, registrants received a notification.

The state says the portal allows children between the ages of 5 and 11 without the Canadian-approved COVID-19 vaccine to register for some time.

But as Canada approaches approving a vaccine for an age group, it’s important for families to be prepared.

‘When it’s your turn’

“Throughout the pandemic, BC’s approach to ordering vaccines is to let people know when it’s the book’s turn,” a health spokesman said. “You are scheduled because it’s your turn, not when you sign up.”

To register online, you must provide your first and last name, date of birth, zip code, personal health number, and an email address or phone number where you can receive text messages.

Registration can also be done by phone.

One week ago, earlier than expected, Pfizer and partner BioNTech provided preliminary data to Canadian Health from tests for a COVID-19 stroke for children.

As infections among families and children increase among this cohort this fall, children between the ages of 5 and 11 are expected to receive doses of the approved vaccine.

Between September 30 and October 6, unvaccinated people accounted for 69.4 percent of COVID-19 cases.

On Friday, the state said it would reconsider the closed-door masking rule to better cover children aged five and over to better comply with the new school masking rules for children entering third grade in kindergarten.



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