Wednesday , February 1 2023

Is a bag like a parachute good when you jump off an airplane? Shots



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One study found that parachutes were not more effective than empty rucksacks to protect the jumper from the planes. There was only one catch.

Michael Htten / EyeEm / Getty Images


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Michael Htten / EyeEm / Getty Images

One study found that parachutes were not more effective than empty rucksacks to protect the jumper from the planes. There was only one catch.

Michael Htten / EyeEm / Getty Images

A research published in a major medical magazine has concluded that the parachute is not more effective than an empty bag for protection against damage when a plane is skipped.

But before you go into any disappointment, you've heard the whole story better.

A gold standard for medical research is a task that identifies volunteers randomly to check or interrupt a disappearance and become part of the control group.

No one has ever experimented with a randomly controlled parachute. In fact, medical researchers often use a parachute pattern when they claim that they do not need to do a job because they are already assured that something works.

Cardiologist Robert Yeh, a docent at the Harvard Medical School and a physician at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, got a bad idea one day. He and his colleagues would really encourage parachute research to create a few pointers for potential traps in research shortcuts.

They began talking to those sitting on the plane.

"We will talk and say," There's a 50% chance of jumping out of this plane – without a parachute – ready to be randomized in a job? "" Yeh says.

Only a few people said yes to this ugly invitation and they were excluded for suspicious mental health reasons.

Scientists are asking members of their research team to participate in volunteerism practices at Harvard, University of California, Los Angeles (where Yeh brother is a professor of surgery) and the University of Michigan (where a friend works). other planes.

All 23 people were given a random backpack or parachute and then missed a helicopter in the Martha Vineyard in Massachusetts and Michigan.

Daredevil Joanne Healy, one of the participants of the event, is leaping from an airplane. (Spoiler warning: He is wearing a backpack.)

With the permission of Robert Yehin


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With the permission of Robert Yehin

Daredevil Joanne Healy, one of the participants of the event, is leaping from an airplane. (Spoiler warning: He is wearing a backpack.)

With the permission of Robert Yehin

Relying on two places, only two types of aircraft gave a very crooked example to the researchers. But this problem is frequently raised in studies that are part of Yeh and his team.

Still, photographs taken during the experiment were very happy to volunteer. Yeh says: "People make all the paths of the earth laugh.

There is an important detail here. The Biplan and the helicopter were parked, as the fall was about 2 meters.

No one suffered any damage. Surprise, surprise. Technically, parachutes do not protect these jumps better than the backpacks.

"But, of course, this is a terrible result," says Yeh. "The real answer is that it does not benefit from the illness that has been registered."

If they have a high risk of injury to humans, that is the people flying airplanes, the results would be quite different (ethical migration can not be said).

However, such a thing happens everyday medical examination. It is very easy for academics who have patients and conditions to get their results out of their expectations and find the results they want to see. The aim of this research was to convey this idea to the ridiculous limit.

The results of the study have been published in a traditional lightweight edition of the medical journal, BMJ.

Yeh says, "We have to look at this fine pressure, and we have to understand the context in which the research has been made and the results are truly interpreted." Scientists often read the outcome of a study, and then gain the most outspoken results based on actual results.

This is a real problem in science.

Professor of Epidemiology at Emory University, Cecile Janssens, says, "I know people often do not look enough to investigate how to interpret the results of trials."

Janssens was pleased to see Twitter on paper. According to him, as many researches, the results are increasingly accurate, but "the results are thrown into a man who is only a few meters away."

It is planned to present this article in a straightforward manner and to see how much time it takes to get deeper points in the scientific methodology embedded in this absurd experiment.

"It will be unforgettable," he says, rather than a straight-forward scientific research.

Yeh is happy to see his entertainment with his colleagues turned into a teaching tool. It also protects some of the more delicate lessons that you bury in your paper.

For example, scientists have tried to present a research paper that is needed for a large number of human research topics. Selecting one in Sri Lanka, it will be disclosed in advance and reduce the risk of wounding the joke. Denied.

"They were thinking that these tests would not be scientifically proven."

"They're right!" adds a bullet.

In fact, the members of the paper research team have intensified their efforts that "all authors have been deeply concerned about the abdomen".

"The greatest achievement of all of us is that we have a great feeling that Sir Isaac Newton has shown us in the paper," he said. They relied on Newton's classic 1687, which laid the law of gravity.

Yes, weight is a law. Accuse yourself at your own risk.

You can contact NPR Research Officer Richard Harris by email: [email protected]

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