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Know the relationship between alcohol consumption and cold climate



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According to a new US survey, those who live in parts of the world, where the days are shorter and cooler and drink more alcohol, are at greater risk of liver disease. Yes, you heard it right! The findings of this study are shocking! Read on to find out more.

Researchers in the Department of Gastroenterology at the University of Pittsburgh have conducted a new study to investigate whether life in colder, darker climates can lead to more alcohol consumption in humans and what effect this can have on alcoholic cirrhosis. Researchers have noticed the relationship between climate factors, alcohol consumption), the percentage of the population consuming alcoholic beverages along with the rate of excessive alcohol consumption.

Findings, published in Hepatology, suggest that the temperature and the number of hourly hours have decreased, drinking has increased. According to the researchers, cooler, darker days also contribute to excessive alcohol consumption and a higher rate of liver disease.

According to the lead author Meritxell Ventura-Cots, PhD, it is vital to highlight the many confounding factors. Alcohol consumption is also associated with depression, which is worsening in the winter months and when sunlight is lower.

According to Ramon Bataller, M.D., PhD, this is the first study to show that throughout the world and in America, in colder areas and less sunny areas, you have more alcohol and more cirrhosis.

Health factors that can aggravate the effects of alcohol on the liver, such as viral hepatitis, obesity and smoking. Drinking alcohol for longer can give you a tough time. It can remove your peace and can put you at risk of many diseases. It can interfere with your professional and personal life. So this research can be an eye-opener. So people will have to make efforts to reduce alcohol if they feel they will board.

Published: November 18, 2018 11:08 am Updated: November 18, 2018 11:09 am


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