Friday , September 30 2022

How to make "survival" non-irritating



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Fallout 76Bethesda

I feel like my time with Fallout 76 likely to end. I'm not even close to the maximum level, but after about 20-30 hours, the game has been revealed to be an endless series of uninteresting feich searches, and although exploration is fun, its course is running.

Not to mention the game seems determined to make me hate it at all times.

Fallout has always been a "survival-lite" game to some extent, flirting with the character maintenance engineer that makes it seem like you're trying to survive in a nuclear wilderness. This mainly occurs in the form of Rads, which reduces your sensitivity to health through exposure to the radiation you need to cure or bring weight, which limits the number of objects you can take. And then there is the eternal scrounging for ammunition.

But Fallout 76 has turned the remote control up. Previous Fallout games have survival "ways" that further up the crowds that they like, and now some of these elements are mandatory elements at 76. While I understand that there is public about such things, it's not for me, and I hate that many of them are no longer optional.

Fallout 76 has food or drink counters that need to be refilled continuously and will be depleted if you do more or less anything in the game, even if you stay idle. You are constantly asking to cook food or clean water for reasons that are just … filling these small bars back to make sure you do not suffer from AP penalties or flattened dying. It feels like weighing three HP bars at the same time without a real end.

Fallout 76Bethesda

Fallout 76 also has the return of object degradation, a mechanic I hate anywhere I find it, even if it's in another great game like Breath of the Wild. Here, what it means is that your weapons and armor are constantly breaking down, if you just … use them, and because of the online nature of the game, that means you can not just reload and rerun hard times. If you say, you miss a knife fight with a bunch of Super Mutants, you can not just reload and try again, you have to respawn and fight again, only you are keeping the weapon and armor damage from the first fight. You can see how this can be turned into a down spiral and why I spend half the cleaning game just to make sure that my shotgun does not only decompose in my hand during a fire or pieces of my armor do not fall into chunks leaving me exposed to even low level enemies that suddenly can lull great damage to my body covered by jumpsuit.

Add these new survival mechanisms to the old ones and Fallout constantly fixes you with HP, AP, speed, object effectiveness, shielding and weapons, and so on. And I think a good point of comparison is nothing more than Rockstar's recent brushing with over-realism on Red Dead Redemption 2.

While Red Dead Redemption 2 is not a survival game with any definition of the genre, it actually tries to instill realism in the game, also having things like the need to eat and repair your weapons, or limit how much you can carry. And yet it does it in ways that are way, way less annoying than Fallout 76.

Red Dead 2Rock star

In Red Dead Redemption 2, your guns will get dirty over time through excessive use. This does not force them to break into your hand and become useless, making their stats a little worse until you use a single item, the pistol, to clean them.

In Red Dead Redemption 2, you can eat to refill your health / strength nuclei, which determine how fast your health / stamina is, but you can also recharge them through sleep. And while the game tells you that the food will affect your weight, your main purpose is to make Arthur look like an impossible ghoul, and the food feels like a natural part of the game and not with some alarm bell, your screen's angle alerts you that you HAVE to eat if you suffer from some untold punishment or fate.

Red Dead really does not care much about inventory space for all items except weapons. All your weapons are stored on your horse that is almost everywhere, or they can be there when you whistle. While you can not get 20 weapons in the battle, it's pretty easy to get to them. It also turns the hunting trips into literal trips where you have to get a bear skin back to your horse's arm with a hand which is realistic enough to be pleasant and not to say draining your strength at a 3x speed because you're " overloaded "the recent acquisition of death or premium.

The point is that the Red Dead 2 and Fallout 76 are essentially the same types of engineering (less poisoning than radiation), but in a game they feel realistic, where in another they feel like a never-ending series of cranky work. I get that some people love the game's survival details for health and resource management, but I think there was one reason that was optional operation in previous games, and making the key part of the experience here has not made anyone any favors.

Follow with & nbsp;on Twitter, & nbsp;Facebook& nbsp; and& nbsp;Instagram. & nbsp; Read my new novel thriller sci-fi& nbsp;Herokiller, now available in hard copy and online. I also wrote& nbsp;The Earthly Trilogy.

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I feel like my time with Fallout 76 is probably coming to an end. I'm not even close to the maximum level, but after about 20-30 hours, the game has been revealed to be an endless series of uninteresting feich searches, and although exploration is fun, its course is running.

Not to mention the game seems determined to make me hate it at all times.

Fallout has always been a "survival-lite" game to some extent, flirting with the character maintenance engineer that makes it seem like you're trying to survive in a nuclear wilderness. This mainly occurs in the form of Rads, which reduces your sensitivity to health through exposure to the radiation you need to cure or bring weight, which limits the number of objects you can take. And then there is the eternal scrounging for ammunition.

But Fallout 76 has turned the remote control up. Previous Fallout games have survival "ways" that further up the crowds that they like, and now some of these elements are mandatory elements at 76. While I understand that there is public about such things, it's not for me, and I hate that many of them are no longer optional.

Fallout 76 has food or drink counters that need to be refilled continuously and will be depleted if you do more or less anything in the game, even if you stay idle. You are constantly asking to cook food or clean water for reasons that are just … filling these small bars back to make sure you do not suffer from AP penalties or flattened dying. It feels like weighing three HP bars at the same time without a real end.

Fallout 76 also has the return of object degradation, a mechanic I hate anywhere I find it, even if it's in another great game like Breath of the Wild. Here, what it means is that your weapons and armor are constantly breaking down, if you just … use them, and because of the online nature of the game, that means you can not just reload and rerun hard times. If you say, you miss a knife fight with a bunch of Super Mutants, you can not just reload and try again, you have to respawn and fight again, only you are keeping the weapon and armor damage from the first fight. You can see how this can be turned into a down spiral and why I spend half the cleaning game just to make sure that my shotgun does not only decompose in my hand during a fire or pieces of my armor do not fall into chunks leaving me exposed to even low level enemies that suddenly can lull great damage to my body covered by jumpsuit.

Add these new survival mechanisms to the old ones and Fallout constantly fixes you with HP, AP, speed, object effectiveness, shielding and weapons, and so on. And I think a good point of comparison is nothing more than Rockstar's recent brushing with over-realism on Red Dead Redemption 2.

While Red Dead Redemption 2 is not a survival game with any definition of the genre, it actually tries to instill realism in the game, also having things like the need to eat and repair your weapons, or limit how much you can carry. And yet it does it in ways that are way, way less annoying than Fallout 76.

In Red Dead Redemption 2, your guns will get dirty over time through excessive use. This does not force them to break into your hand and become useless, making their stats a little worse until you use a single item, the pistol, to clean them.

In Red Dead Redemption 2, you can eat to refill your health / strength nuclei, which determine how fast your health / stamina is, but you can also recharge them through sleep. And while the game tells you that the food will affect your weight, your main purpose is to make Arthur look like an impossible ghoul, and the food feels like a natural part of the game and not with some alarm bell, your screen's angle alerts you that you HAVE to eat if you suffer from some untold punishment or fate.

Red Dead really does not care much about inventory space for all items except weapons. All your weapons are stored on your horse that is almost everywhere, or they can be there when you whistle. While you can not get 20 weapons in the battle, it's pretty easy to get to them. It also turns the hunting trips into literal trips where you have to get a bear skin back to your horse's arm with a hand which is realistic enough to be pleasant and not to say draining your strength at a 3x speed because you're " overloaded "the recent acquisition of death or premium.

The point is that the Red Dead 2 and Fallout 76 are essentially the same types of engineering (less poisoning than radiation), but in a game they feel realistic, where in another they feel like a never-ending series of cranky work. I get that some people love the game's survival details for health and resource management, but I think there was one reason that was optional operation in previous games, and making the key part of the experience here has not made anyone any favors.

Follow me on TwitterFacebook and Facebook Istangram. Read my new novel thriller sci-fi Herokiller, now available in hard copy and online. I also wrote The Earthly Trilogy.

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